View
Publication Type
Conference Proceedings
Author, Analytic
Beman, Donna A.; Branday, Joseph M.; Ragoobirsingh, Dalip; Paul, Tomlin J.
Author Role
n/a
Author Affiliation
n/a
Paper/Section Title
Teaching Beyond The Core How Long Can It Continue?
Medium Designator
n/a
Connective Phrase
n/a
Editor/Compiler
n/a
Editor/Compiler Role
n/a
Proceedings Title
The International Association of Medical Science Educators (IAMSE) Conference
Date of Meeting
July 2008
Place of Meeting
Utah, U.S.A.
Place of Publication
n/a
Publisher Name
n/a
Date of Publication
2009
Date of Copyright
n/a
Volume ID
n/a
Location in Work
n/a
Extent of Work
n/a
Packaging Method
n/a
Series Editor
n/a
Series Editor Role
n/a
Series Title
n/a
Series Volume ID
n/a
Location/URL
n/a
ISBN
n/a
Notes
n/a
Abstract
PURPOSE: In 2001 a revised undergraduate medical curriculum was introduced at the University of the West Indies, Mona (Jamaica) campus. This curriculum includes a Special Study Module (SSM) programme for students in the first three years (Stage 1). In SSMs students pursue small course of limited content which delivers material that is in addition to or outside of the core of knowledge required by all students. This paper evaluates the first seven years of the SSM programme and the challenges of maintaining it. METHODS: A total of 49 SSMs were reviewed and categorised according to the area of concentration. A focus group involving staff and students was conducted at which participants carried out a SWOT (Strengths-Weaknesses- Opportunities- Threats) analysis of the programme followed by discussion to identify the options for its future. RESULTS: One-third of the SSMs covered clinical areas while 11.2% addressed the basic sciences. The SWOT analysis revealed a wide range of benefits to participating students and opportunities for curriculum diversification through collaboration with external stakeholders. The main weaknesses that were identified resulted from a lack of resource support and the threat of an expanding core curriculum eroding time for non-core activities. CONCLUSION: Special study subjects in the early years of medical training are largely covering non-core topics. Given the student interest and perceived benefits, the maintenance of this programme requires greater buy-in from staff and will depend largely on both increased resource support and allocation of time.....
read more