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Publication Type
Conference Proceedings
UWI Author(s)
Author, Analytic
Robertson, James
Author Role
n/a
Author Affiliation
Department of History and Archaeology
Paper/Section Title
As the John Crow flies: A preliminary survey of aerial images of jamaica
Medium Designator
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Connective Phrase
In
Editor/Compiler
n/a
Editor/Compiler Role
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Proceedings Title
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Date of Meeting
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Place of Meeting
n/a
Place of Publication
Kingston, Jamaica
Publisher Name
Institute of Jamaica
Date of Publication
2006
Date of Copyright
n/a
Volume ID
29
Location in Work
44-53
Extent of Work
80
Packaging Method
n/a
Series Editor
n/a
Series Editor Role
n/a
Series Title
n/a
Series Volume ID
n/a
Location/URL
n/a
ISBN
n/a
Notes
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Abstract
In 1942, the officers of Jamaica's military garrison who nursed their gins at the bar of the Liguanea Club admitted three fears. First, that German 'special service troops, heavily armed and 300 strong, might swoop ashore from submarines', perhaps rowing into Bull Bay, or else following all those other feared invaders of seventh-century and eighteenth-century Jamaica to come ashore at Old Harbour before attacking Spanish Town and Kingston. Next, they were nervous that they would miss the war and, increasingly, they worried that the newly arrived American troops in their lease-lend base at Fort Simons, Vernamfield in Clarendon, would produce the up-to-date map of Jamaica that the colony's Survey Department had long failed to complete. Six years earlier, the department had proposed an aerial survey as a preliminary to such as map, but the Royal Air Force refused to send a plane when it had no West Indian base and, in the depths of the Great Depression, the Air Ministry's alternative suggestion of hiring a commercial air survey firm led nowhere. ......
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