View
Publication Type
Conference Proceedings
Author, Analytic
Robinson, Edward; Khan, Shakira; Rowe, Deborah; Coutou, Richard
Author Role
n/a
Author Affiliation
n/a
Paper/Section Title
Size of shoreline boulders moved and emplaced by recent hurricanes, Jamaica.
Medium Designator
n/a
Connective Phrase
n/a
Editor/Compiler
n/a
Editor/Compiler Role
n/a
Proceedings Title
Second International Tsunami Field Symposium, UNESCO/IGCP Project 496.
Date of Meeting
September 2008
Place of Meeting
Italy & Greece
Place of Publication
n/a
Publisher Name
n/a
Date of Publication
2008
Date of Copyright
n/a
Volume ID
n/a
Location in Work
n/a
Extent of Work
n/a
Packaging Method
n/a
Series Editor
n/a
Series Editor Role
n/a
Series Title
n/a
Series Volume ID
n/a
Location/URL
n/a
ISBN
n/a
Notes
n/a
Abstract
Identification of sedimentary deposits on elevated coastal limestone platforms on Jamaica raised questions of origin of these deposits (Robinson et al., 2006; Rowe et al. in press). Based on form and distribution, these deposits were classified into three main categories; debris ridges, perched beaches and isolated boulder strews. During the period 2004 to 2007 the south coast of Jamaica was impacted by five hurricanes, all of which reached category 4 in the neighbourhood of Jamaica and three of which reached category 5 near the island (figure 1). These storms generated surges and wave run-up reaching as much as 5 m above sea-level and penetrated inland to distances exceeding 200 m in places, and surge and waves breaking over 12 m high cliffs in other places. Hurricanes Ivan and Dean generated the most onshore debris. These processes deposited sediments ranging from sand and coral fragments to large boulders and have provided additional insight on the emplacement and transport of debris on shore. Five sites were examined (labeled dots on figure 1) that include boulders occurring naturally. A sixth site was serendipitously made available when a boulder revetment, constructed to protect the road from Kingston to the airport, was destroyed by hurricane Dean (arrow on figure 1).....
read more
Keywords