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Publication Type
Journal Article
UWI Author(s)
Author, Analytic
Spence, J. M.; Taylor, Michael A.
Author Affiliation, Ana.
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Article Title
Jamaica: State of the Climate in 2007.
Medium Designator
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Connective Phrase
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Journal Title
Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society
Translated Title
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Reprint Status
Refereed
Date of Publication
2008
Volume ID
89
Issue ID
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Page(s)
120
Language
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Connective Phrase
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Location/URL
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ISSN
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Notes
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Abstract
Jamaican rainfall in 2007 reflected the influence of warm anomalies in the tropical North Atlantic through June and cold anomalies in the equatorial Pacific through December. Respectively, the temperature anomalies contributed to wetter-than-normal conditions in both May (the early rainfall peak; Figure 6.20) and between August and November (the primary rainfall period). For both periods, most parishes equaled or exceeded the 30-year mean, with some (Trelawny in the north; St Catherine and Clarendon in the south) in excess of twice the normal rainfall during October–November. Intense and persistent island-wide rainfall during the latter half of March contributed to the wettest March on record, which is climatologically the driest month. Frontal systems stayed well north of Jamaica during December, resulting in most parishes falling below their 30-year mean. The impact was most severe for southern regions, which constitute the main agricultural belt. The December rainfall deficits were consistent with the north (dry)–south (wet) gradient in Caribbean rainfall associated with La Niña conditions. Prevailing warm Caribbean ocean temperatures resulted in positive air temperature anomalies of up to 1°C for most stations for the first five months of the year. Thereafter, the traditionally warmer months saw negative anomalies, especially over southern parishes, likely because of the long periods of persistent cloudiness and rain. By the end of the year, positive temperature anomalies were again reported by some stations while others tended to be near normal. The aforementioned lack of frontal systems in the vicinity of the islands precluded the reduction in temperature that normally accompanies them.....
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