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Publication Type
Journal Article
UWI Author(s)
Author, Analytic
Campbell, CP; Raubenheimer, D; Badaloo, AV; Gluckman, PD; Martinez, C; Gosby, A; Simpson, SJ; Osmond, C; Boyne, Michael S; Forrester, Terrence E;
Author Affiliation, Ana.
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Article Title
Developmental contributions to macronutrient selection: a randomized controlled trial in adult survivors of malnutrition
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Connective Phrase
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Journal Title
Evolution Medicine and Public Health
Translated Title
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Reprint Status
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Date of Publication
2016
Volume ID
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Issue ID
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Page(s)
158-169
Language
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ISSN
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Notes
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Abstract
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:Birthweight differences between kwashiorkor and marasmus suggest that intrauterine factors influence the development of these syndromes of malnutrition and may modulate risk of obesity through dietary intake. We tested the hypotheses that the target protein intake in adulthood is associated with birthweight, and that protein leveraging to maintain this target protein intake would influence energy intake (EI) and body weight in adult survivors of malnutrition.METHODOLOGY:Sixty-three adult survivors of marasmus and kwashiorkor could freely compose a diet from foods containing 10, 15 and 25 percentage energy from protein (percentage of energy derived from protein (PEP); Phase 1) for 3 days. Participants were then randomized in Phase 2 (5 days) to diets with PEP fixed at 10%, 15% or 25%.RESULTS:Self-selected PEP was similar in both groups. In the groups combined, selected PEP was 14.7, which differed significantly (P < 0.0001) from the null expectation (16.7%) of no selection. Self-selected PEP was inversely related to birthweight, the effect disappearing after adjusting for sex and current body weight. In Phase 2, PEP correlated inversely with EI (P = 0.002) and weight change from Phase 1 to 2 (P = 0.002). Protein intake increased with increasing PEP, but to a lesser extent than energy increased with decreasing PEP.CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS:Macronutrient intakes were not independently related to birthweight or diagnosis. In a free-choice situation (Phase 1), subjects selected a dietary PEP significantly lower than random. Lower PEP diets induce increased energy and decreased protein intake, and are associated with weight gain.....
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